[[ DOWNLOAD EPUB ]] ⇮ Hot ✖ Mark Hertsgaard – Britakristina.se

I skimmed the other reviews and it seems the main complaint with the book is that it is bleak and depressing and this is, apparently, the author s fault I wish I could say I were shocked to see such blatant evidence that we as a culture now feel ourselves entitled not only to the pursuit of happiness in a really big house with a bunch of oversized televisions and closets full of crap we never use, but entitled also to books that will describe to us a catastrophe that could end human civilization and render the planet unfit for human habitation in an uplifting and hopeful manner That s incredible Sorry to say, buttercups, but as anyone with even the slightest modicum of a background in climate change will tell you, if this book has one major flaw and it does , it is that it is too optimistic.It s over optimism rests primarily on the lack of analysis of where the solutions he presents will actually take us Are they enough He never says He is a journalist by training, not a scientist, so he goes after the story which he does with aplomb As a result, I was left holding a grab bag of potential policies to address climate change and absolutely no idea if that grab bag would, if implemented universally beginning tomorrow, possibly be enough I suspect they wouldn t Yep, that s not optimism, but I ve read dozens of books on climate change and at least a hundred articles and research papers and I ve worked in the environmental field for a long time now, so this is based on something than an innate propensity towards doom and gloom Which, by the way, I don t have That said, the material is comprehensive, engaging, well written, fairly thorough, global in scope, and as a parent I appreciated the focus on his young daughter I share his motivation with my work and writing and activism so I know all too well what he writes of when he writes of his fear and rage over his daughter s future So I would not hesitate to recommend this to anyone with a basic to moderate understanding of climate change anyone who is already well versed in the subject will likely find it repetitive rather than illuminating On a scientific basis I found Andrew Weaver s book better he s one of the world s leading climatologists look up Keeping Our Cool if interested but Hot is still worthwhile.If, on the other hand, you think books about climate change should be chipper and upbeat so you can feel good about your and your born unborn children s prospects, might I recommend giving up and going back to Harlequin novels. [[ DOWNLOAD EPUB ]] ☠ Hot ✗ A Fresh Take On Climate Change By A Renowned Journalist Driven To Protect His Daughter, Your Kids, And The Next Generation Who Ll Inherit The Problem For Twenty Years, Mark Hertsgaard Has Investigated Global Warming For Outlets Including The New Yorker, NPR, Time, Vanity Fair, And The Nation But The Full Truth Did Not Hit Home Until He Became A Father And, Soon Thereafter, Learned That Climate Change Had Already Arrived A Century Earlier Than Forecast With Impacts Bound To Worsen For Decades To Come Hertsgaard S Daughter Chiara, Now Five Years Old, Is Part Of What He Has Dubbed Generation Hot The Two Billion Young People Worldwide Who Will Spend The Rest Of Their Lives Coping With Mounting Climate Disruption HOT Is A Father S Cry Against Climate Change, But Most Of The Book Focuses On Solutions, Offering A Deeply Reported Blueprint For How All Of Us As Parents, Communities, Companies And Countries Can Navigate This Unavoidable New Era Combining Reporting From Across The Nation And Around The World With Personal Reflections On His Daughter S Future, Hertsgaard Provides Pictures Of What Is Expected Over The Next Fifty Years Chicago S Climate Transformed To Resemble Houston S Dwindling Water Supplies And Crop Yields At Home And Abroad The Redesign Of New York And Other Cities Against Mega Storms And Sea Level Rise Above All, He Shows Who Is Taking Wise, Creative Precautions For In The End, HOT Is A Book About How We Ll Survive Palestrina and Other Plays Your Kids Life Story: Many Lives, One Epic Journey And The Next Generation Who Ll Inherit The Problem For Twenty Years Diamonds Forever Mark Hertsgaard Has Investigated Global Warming For Outlets Including The New Yorker Saddle Sore NPR Lady Caroline and the Egotistical Earl Time PNEUMATIKA CHARISMATA Vanity Fair யானை டாக்டர் [Yaanai Doctor] And The Nation But The Full Truth Did Not Hit Home Until He Became A Father And Stable Farewell Soon Thereafter Selected Short Stories of John O'Hara Learned That Climate Change Had Already Arrived A Century Earlier Than Forecast With Impacts Bound To Worsen For Decades To Come Hertsgaard S Daughter Chiara Lights Out for the Territory: 9 Excursions in the Secret History of London Now Five Years Old National Service: Conscription in Britain 1945-1963 Is Part Of What He Has Dubbed Generation Hot The Two Billion Young People Worldwide Who Will Spend The Rest Of Their Lives Coping With Mounting Climate Disruption HOT Is A Father S Cry Against Climate Change The Fort Langley Journals, 1827-30 But Most Of The Book Focuses On Solutions Battlefront II: Inferno Squad Offering A Deeply Reported Blueprint For How All Of Us As Parents Motty: Forty Years in the Commentary Box Communities How Green Was My Valley (Penguin Active Reading (Graded Readers)) Companies And Countries Can Navigate This Unavoidable New Era Combining Reporting From Across The Nation And Around The World With Personal Reflections On His Daughter S Future Memoirs of a Geisha Hertsgaard Provides Pictures Of What Is Expected Over The Next Fifty Years Chicago S Climate Transformed To Resemble Houston S Dwindling Water Supplies And Crop Yields At Home And Abroad The Redesign Of New York And Other Cities Against Mega Storms And Sea Level Rise Above All Girl Online On Tour He Shows Who Is Taking Wise Girl Online On Tour Creative Precautions For In The End Entangled HOT Is A Book About How We Ll Survive So good This was written about 10 years ago 10 years before I read it, I mean so it was very interesting to note how we viewed the climate crisis then vs now And how we definitely have not done enough in our adaptation and mitigation efforts A lot of research went into this book Very accessible language, a lot of anecdotes and real world examples The way he was writing it for his young daughter was very sweet, and I think it puts the shortened timeline we have into perspective. Update, post hurricane Sandy, autumn 2012 Mark Hertsgaard wrote an essay forThe Nation Hurricane Sandy as Greek Tragedywhich provides yet evidence of our world s slow motion train wreck The name of the hurricane provides the most poignant and realistic note Sandy is short for Cassandra, the Greek mythological figure who epitomizes tragedy The gods gave Cassandra the gift of prophecy depending on which version of the story one prefers, she could either see or smell the future But with this gift also came a curse Cassandra s warnings about future disasters were fated to be ignored That is the essence of this tragedy to know that a given course of action will lead to disaster but to pursue it nevertheless.Hertsgaard states that There are signs of hope but his threshold must be abysmally low Does he really believe that Especially in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, there is no reason to continue disregarding scientists warnings about where our current path leads Of course, there are plenty of reasons, and he knows what they are There is plenty of money behind the push to deny this, and huge portions of the American demos have passively chosen to believe there is a controversy, either because the issue is tied strongly to their other ideological positions, or because it is convenient to be too busy to worry about such long term problems.Hertsgaard again has the wrong attitude and the wrong tone of voice This message might be a bit persuasive if it were delivered in tones of a thundering Mosaic condemnation from Mount Sinai Because he leavens his message with unwarranted optimism, his message and the tragedy are both left easy to ignore.Back to my original review Mark Hertsgaard s book covers a lot of ground, and I d argue that in the coming years there is no important topic that anyone could study This book is a decent start, but in the end I was disappointed primarily because he was too optimistic.All of the accumulated evidence is that we are so far from any significant mitigation of global warming that it as if someone is writing the script for a very black comedy of errors But Hersgaard ends in an upbeat mood, asserting that we ll do this, because well, because we have to The alternative is too horrendous to contemplate.The problem with that prognosis is two fold First, even people that believe global warming is taking place seldom have examined how very nasty the latter half of the twentieth century will probably be Sure, some cautionary descriptions have floated around, but even picking a single example hides the panoramic sweep of the changes and the trauma Much like looking at the aftermath of a hurricane or tsunami through a telescope, you only examine details by losing the ability to see everything else.Second, collective action is naturally slow in coming when the costs of change will undoubtedly be high Deniers have been criminal in making things worse by sowing doubt when there really is very little doubt A reasonable prediction is that people won t agree on the need for real action until much later in the game A few hundred deaths from a clutch of tornadoes here, a few billion dollars in damage from hurricanes there, climbing food scarcity due to floods here and droughts there it will all get shrugged off as just plain bad luck for another decade or And by that time Hertsgaard has a very well chosen framing narrative here although, as other reviewers have noted he gets too bathetic, especially towards the end of the book He has recently become a father, and there is some cognitive dissonance between the horror story he keeps finding as he has researched this book, and the warm and happy feelings he has when he looks at his young daughter He s right to worry In her anticipated lifespan she could easily witness changes that dramatically reduce any expectation she has for a pleasant life.It s too bad that this book hasn t told the bad side of that story Many pages were devoted to how, for example, a few tiny parts of the United States and other wealthy countries have made baby steps towards adaptation And pages turn to how difficult it is to prepare But while he notes out that floods kill thousands, drought can kill millions, but he doesn t go much deeper Drought is potentially a problem in so many parts of the world that he should probably warn about tens of millions of deaths And once people start seeing that, do we really expect them to peacefully beg for help Water wars have been a hot topic of study in international relations for many years now where are the interviews regarding that With climate change triggering food scarcity, these problems are likely to cascade upon one another.The book s single instance of humor is inadequately dark You know the joke, don t you Under climate change the future is definitely going to be wetter Or drier Unless it s both I think the only honest conclusion is that the future is definitely going to be wetter, drier and much deadlier Also see the New York Times review,Poisoning the Well , February 4, 2011 Image from Queensland 2010 2011 floodImage from Thailand s 2011 floodImage from Hurricane SandyI guess I like the juxtaposition of one of the causes of climate change and one of the effects. I skimmed the other reviews and it seems the main complaint with the book is that it is bleak and depressing and this is, apparently, the author s fault I wish I could say I were shocked to see such blatant evidence that we as a culture now feel ourselves entitled not only to the pursuit of happiness in a really big house with a bunch of oversized televisions and closets full of crap we never use, but entitled also to books that will describe to us a catastrophe that could end human civilization and render the planet unfit for human habitation in an uplifting and hopeful manner That s incredible Sorry to say, buttercups, but as anyone with even the slightest modicum of a background in climate change will tell you, if this book has one major flaw and it does , it is that it is too optimistic.It s over optimism rests primarily on the lack of analysis of where the solutions he presents will actually take us Are they enough He never says He is a journalist by training, not a scientist, so he goes after the story which he does with aplomb As a result, I was left holding a grab bag of potential policies to address climate change and absolutely no idea if that grab bag would, if implemented universally beginning tomorrow, possibly be enough I suspect they wouldn t Yep, that s not optimism, but I ve read dozens of books on climate change and at least a hundred articles and research papers and I ve worked in the environmental field for a long time now, so this is based on something than an innate propensity towards doom and gloom Which, by the way, I don t have That said, the material is comprehensive, engaging, well written, fairly thorough, global in scope, and as a parent I appreciated the focus on his young daughter I share his motivation with my work and writing and activism so I know all too well what he writes of when he writes of his fear and rage over his daughter s future So I would not hesitate to recommend this to anyone with a basic to moderate understanding of climate change anyone who is already well versed in the subject will likely find it repetitive rather than illuminating On a scientific basis I found Andrew Weaver s book better he s one of the world s leading climatologists look up Keeping Our Cool if interested but Hot is still worthwhile.If, on the other hand, you think books about climate change should be chipper and upbeat so you can feel good about your and your born unborn children s prospects, might I recommend giving up and going back to Harlequin novels. Hot Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth by Mark Hertsgaard is a thoughtful, pragmatic exploration of climate change impacts and what we can and are doing about them Far from a dry, distant seeming treatise, Hertsgaard s book has a real heart he asks us to visualize along with him how his young daughter and all of our children will survive the myriad changes that are already locked in and unstoppable The challenge, Hertsgaard tells us, is to avoid the unmanageable and manage the unavoidable As the author points out, even among those who are not in denial about climate change, there is still confusion about the difference between mitigation and adaptation Mitigation is what we do to try to prevent man made global warming from proceeding apace Adaptation is what we do to live with the consequences the climate change that, in complex and interconnected ways, already is threatening our very ability to survive Both approaches are critically important.Hertsgaard devotes much of this book to presenting problems already being caused by climate change and showing how communities, businesses, and governments are responding Unlike in the U.S., where climate change is still cast in an if then light or denied outright by corporatist politicians, much of the world is now facing up to the dire facts Some mitigation and adaptation efforts are doing harm than good, but some such as pro business green development in Seattle, farmer designed natural regeneration agro forestry FMNR in Africa, and far sighted 200 year flood planning in the Netherlands show much promise.I found it hopeful that the huge global insurance industry already knows what is coming and is making decisions accordingly This sometimes means refusing to insure people living in areas prone to major climate driven devastation, but the actions of the insurance industry can be looked to as a barometer of what we need to do to adapt to climate change Prudent risk management strategies on the part of businesses who are in the game for the long haul can help the planet as a whole adapt self interest, a powerful motivator, is not necessarily a dirty word.Acceding the fact that most mitigation and adaptation efforts are large scale long term and therefore must be subsidized by large corporations and governments, Hertsgaard also addresses what individuals can do Learning about intercropping, permaculture, FMNR and other ways to build soil fertility to help store water and carbon is important Growing some of our own food and supporting local farmers is something everyone can do Becoming aware of how precious the water we use is and avoiding wasting it is essential if we are to survive The interface between business and consumer is an area full of potential for adaptation For example, I m hoping we ll soon see reasonably priced family use products such as biochar burners hit the market so folks can create their own carbon sequestering tilth enhancing garden charcoal out of some of their waste.As Darwin said, It is not the strongest of the species that survivesnor the most intelligent that survives It is the one that is most adaptable to change Hertsgaard makes a strong case that, if humans are to survive, we must get busy NOW adapting to climate change that is already happening and cannot be stopped This book goes a long way toward helping us think in those terms. Hot Living Through the Next Fifty Years on Earth by Mark Hertsgaard is a thoughtful, pragmatic exploration of climate change impacts and what we can and are doing about them Far from a dry, distant seeming treatise, Hertsgaard s book has a real heart he asks us to visualize along with him how his young daughter and all of our children will survive the myriad changes that are already locked in and unstoppable The challenge, Hertsgaard tells us, is to avoid the unmanageable and manage the unavoidable As the author points out, even among those who are not in denial about climate change, there is still confusion about the difference between mitigation and adaptation Mitigation is what we do to try to prevent man made global warming from proceeding apace Adaptation is what we do to live with the consequences the climate change that, in complex and interconnected ways, already is threatening our very ability to survive Both approaches are critically important.Hertsgaard devotes much of this book to presenting problems already being caused by climate change and showing how communities, businesses, and governments are responding Unlike in the U.S., where climate change is still cast in an if then light or denied outright by corporatist politicians, much of the world is now facing up to the dire facts Some mitigation and adaptation efforts are doing harm than good, but some such as pro business green development in Seattle, farmer designed natural regeneration agro forestry FMNR in Africa, and far sighted 200 year flood planning in the Netherlands show much promise.I found it hopeful that the huge global insurance industry already knows what is coming and is making decisions accordingly This sometimes means refusing to insure people living in areas prone to major climate driven devastation, but the actions of the insurance industry can be looked to as a barometer of what we need to do to adapt to climate change Prudent risk management strategies on the part of businesses who are in the game for the long haul can help the planet as a whole adapt self interest, a powerful motivator, is not necessarily a dirty word.Acceding the fact that most mitigation and adaptation efforts are large scale long term and therefore must be subsidized by large corporations and governments, Hertsgaard also addresses what individuals can do Learning about intercropping, permaculture, FMNR and other ways to build soil fertility to help store water and carbon is important Growing some of our own food and supporting local farmers is something everyone can do Becoming aware of how precious the water we use is and avoiding wasting it is essential if we are to survive The interface between business and consumer is an area full of potential for adaptation For example, I m hoping we ll soon see reasonably priced family use products such as biochar burners hit the market so folks can create their own carbon sequestering tilth enhancing garden charcoal out of some of their waste.As Darwin said, It is not the strongest of the species that survivesnor the most intelligent that survives It is the one that is most adaptable to change Hertsgaard makes a strong case that, if humans are to survive, we must get busy NOW adapting to climate change that is already happening and cannot be stopped This book goes a long way toward helping us think in those terms. There s a LOT of meat here, a lot of very important information It s presented in a fairly dense format and is not terribly well written From a journalistic standpoint, it s well done, but it s too dense for a book, in my opinion.This book also tips into the bathetic on than one occasion as Hertsgaard talks about fatherhood and the fact that his own personal, perfect, adorable princess of a child will be dealing with climate change And though he does admit that there are other children in the world, one gets the sense that he doesn t find them nearly as important as his own princess And, sure, we all feel that way to some degree, but journalistic integrity demands we at least try to suppress it a little whilst reporting on a topic we are trying to present as universal.I m perhaps focusing on the negatives so I can avoid talking about the primary message of this book, which seems to be that we are screwed as a planet Deeply, irremediably screwed Unless we all wake up by noon tomorrow and change our ways and somehow I m doubting that the corporations who now own my country are going to be cooperating with that.Hertsgaard offers some crumbs of hope, but they are merely crumbs I can t imagine my grandchildren s world, but life seems to be heading back towards nasty, brutish and short in a big hurry.So 4 stars for content, 3 for writing and 1 for sentimentality Averaged out. Forced optimism in a survey of global warming and climate changeWe are now at least a decade into what journalist Mark Hertsgaard terms the second era of global warming, which began sometime around the turn of the 20th century As he writes, The battle to prevent dangerous climate change was now over the race to survive it has begun Hertsgaard probably has as broad and deep an understanding of global warming and its consequences in the form of climate change of any nonscientist on the planet He has been writing about the topic for than two decades and has interviewed most of the major players in climate science climate related government policy not just for this book, which involved five years of travel around the world, but for Earth Odyssey, a widely read investigation published in 1999 that reflected seven years of travel The man knows whereof he writes Hot is the author s attempt to find a hopeful path forward through the gathering storm of climate change Throughout, he ponders the life his young daughter, Chiara, will face in adulthood Much of Hot is written in an optimistic tone Hertsgaard explores a laundry list of policies and procedures that, if widely implemented, will permit humanity to forestall the extremes of climate change and to adapt to its nonetheless unavoidable consequences Some of the practices he touts painting roofs white and planting trees in African fields, for example could, in fact, achieve a great deal if universally employed His theme is Avoid the unmanageable, manage the unavoidable Distinguishing between mitigation efforts to reduce carbon emissions and adaptation finding ways to adjust to the changing climate Hertsgaard devotes most of the book to the latter Previous writing on global warming has tended to focus on mitigation, which heavily involves government and corporate policy Adaption consists largely of changing the way people and communities behave Unfortunately, though, the context in which he writes is not encouraging We live in a world in which massive corporations spend millions to protect their short term profits regardless of the consequences, major news media reflect the views of their corporate owners, the overwhelming majority of people deny the obvious, and policymakers demonstrate their affinity for the art of the possible rather than showing true leadership To a knowledgeable reader, much of the optimism in Hot seems forced What it all boils down to is this We face a towering challenge Countries that today are all but addicted to fossil fuels must quit carbon within the next two to three decades Deforestation and other climate damaging activities must also be brought to a halt worldwide And even poor and emerging economies must halt almost all emissions by 2050 Yet even if we manage all this, it will give us merely a two out of three chance to limit temperature rise to 2 degrees C about preindustrial levels, itself an achievement of dubious merit, for it will mean the lost of most of the world s coral reefs, the disappearance of most of its mountain snowpacks, and enough sea level rise, eventually, to inundate the existing coastlines on every continent The facts are disturbingly grim even if the human race somehow manages to come to grips with the existential threat of climate change and to do everything recommended by the authors of the most alarming scientific reports, we are already locked into at least 30 years, and possibly as many as 50 years, of serious trouble Climate change will worsen existing conflicts over water supplies, energy sources, and weather induced migration Economic prosperity is also endangered Approximately 25 percent of the gross national product of the United States is at risk from extreme weather events, according to the American Meteorological Society and the American Geophysical Union One of the greatest threats to civilization lies in our oceans Three feet of sea level rise over the next hundred years which is near the low end of what scientists now expect will pose enormous challenges S ome scientists believe our civilization could experience three feet of sea level rise within the next fifty years Perhaps equally problematic is the certainty of increasing drought Much of Africa, a large swath of South Asia, and large portions of the United States, especially California, the Southwest, and the Great Plains, face intensifying water shortages There is no lack of horror stories available to illustrate the havoc these trends can create However, over and above all the computer modeled predictions for a steady increase in global temperatures over the coming decades is a much horrific possibility the potential that some unanticipated combination of circumstances will trigger positive feedbacks that, in the worst case, could kick off some type of runaway greenhouse dynamics As Hertsgaard explains, Unfortunately, there is ample precedent for this kind of abrupt shift into climate chaos Although the human mind tends to think in gradual, linear terms, ice records and other historical data show that climate shifts, when they occur, tend to happen suddenly and exponentially Worrying about rising temperatures and their consequences is bad enough But it s the potential of a sudden and exponential shift that keeps me awake nights From www.malwarwickonbooks.com The author talks about mitigation along with stopping carbon fuels Mitigation means that it s too late we better learn to deal with climate change even if we woke up tomorrow with 100% sustainability the changes in motion will continue on our planet for thousands of years There are glimmers of hope, it s not just another doom and gloom look at this ongoing crime, but times a wasting and nobody seems to be paying attention. Hot Living Through the Next Fifty Years on EarthMark HertsgaardI thought I was done worrying about imminent disasters of global proportion after y2k.Hah IN THE MEANTIME, environmentalists and other life loving, future looking, do gooders need to stop argueing about mitigation and adaptation mitigation slowing, stopping, reversing climate change soon to be climate chaos adaptation adjusting adapting to the changes We need them both The of the first we have, the less of the second we ll need.KEEP IN MIND, the extent to which we can adjust is a whole lot limited than you think and we are already toying with the upper limits of that Hard to give this book a not so good rating given the importance of the subject, but the writing is not very engaging Hertsgaard uses the birth of his daughter as the impetus for the book what will the world be like when his daughter is an adult as global climate change continues The picture is not very pretty and governments are not doing enough to lessen the impacts ahead Climate change is here We need to both adapt to what it brings and mitigate the causes so as to reduce what we have to adapt to Read The Long Emergency by James Kunstler is better bet to see what s coming This book took me quite a while to read Not because of its length or complexity, but because of the subject matter Climate change is one of the most important issues facing our planet, but because of the enormity of the consequences, it is also one of the scariest In triggering climate change, humanity has unwittingly launched a planetary experiment Because this experiment has never been run before, and because it involves extremely complicated systems, knowing exactly how it will turn out is impossible All of the science and scientific predictions in Hot agree that the results will be far from good There is no disagreement that climate change is here and that it means dire things for many parts of Earth, the only thing that remains to be seen is how dire Because of all of this, I had to read Hot in parts I could only take bits at a time and some bit were easier than others I am lucky enough to live in an area where one of the people profiled as being a positive force regarding climate change is laying good groundwork for our region going forward I could focus on those successes and the things that the author outlined that individuals could do as I read the parts about what would occur if nothing was done.I liked that Hertsgaard puts his daughter and another child at the forefront of this book Because climate change is a gradual occurrence, it easier for many people to take the I ll think about that tomorrow approach But when again and again, Hertsgaard reminds the reader that tomorrow is alive in the children of today, it makes it harder and harder to push the reality away We save mementoes, heirlooms and money for our children s future it s hard to disagree that we need to make sure that the world they will inhabit shouldn t be saved for them as well.I was very interested to read that, Bangladesh has done over the past twenty years to understand and adapt to climate change than any other country in the world except for Great Britain and the Netherlands Which is amazing to me as well as ironic because, There is a terrible injustice at the heart of the climate problem climate change punishes the world s poor first and worst, even though they did almost nothing to bring it on Though there are some very hard and necessary truths in Hot , Mark Hertsgaard does a good job in walking the reader close to the ledge, but then showing them there is a ladder there He deftly shifts the focus between the science of what will probably happen in the next fifty years to the actions that are being taken around the world to minimize and deal with the impacts He does not let the reader off the hook or pretend that everything will be fine but leads them to the blueprints of how things can be better.I applaud the author for taking this subject on, especially with the concerted and highly funded campaign of lying with which climate change deniers are assaulting the world This is about us, but importantly, it is about our children Not the children of tomorrow, but the children we are raising and protecting and loving today We are responsible for laying the foundations that future generations will build on, somewhat like the mason s who laid the foundation of the European cathedrals that took several centuries to complete They knew they would not live to see the final product of their work, but they also knew they needed to do very solid, precise work because of all the weight that was going to be placed on top of their work We, too, need to take this long world view We need to understand that tackling climate change is not only our most important challenge as a people but also possibly our greatest triumph. So good This was written about 10 years ago 10 years before I read it, I mean so it was very interesting to note how we viewed the climate crisis then vs now And how we definitely have not done enough in our adaptation and mitigation efforts A lot of research went into this book Very accessible language, a lot of anecdotes and real world examples The way he was writing it for his young daughter was very sweet, and I think it puts the shortened timeline we have into perspective.

  • Hardcover
  • 352
  • Hot
  • Mark Hertsgaard
  • English
  • 14 January 2019
  • null

About the Author: Mark Hertsgaard

Described by Barbara Ehrenreich as one of America s finest reporters, Mark Hertsgaard has written for the New Yorker , Vanity Fair , and Time , and is author of four books, including Earth Odyssey He has traveled the world seeking answers to the question of how to keep humanity alive in the face of global warning A Soros fellow, he recently attended the Copenhagen Conference, widely